And it’s Published – Journey to the Summit

 So excited to announce the publication of a superb hybrid business-fiction book, I assisted in writing.

Journey to the Summit cover

If you are looking to improve your business marketing, then this is the book for you.

‘This book is dedicated to marketing managers, and CMOs of B2B organizations around the world, who are tasked with bringing transformation to their organizations by creating a functional Marketing Department that is 100% Revenue Driven, while being challenged with the ultimate ‘mission impossible’ on the planet – Sales and Marketing Alignment.This book is also dedicated to CEOs, who know that marketing is critical in bringing them 10X or more exponential growth for their B2B organization, and to VPs of Sales, who are 100% frustrated by the marketing effort. They are praying, each day that their team can help them by bringing them closer to their Annual Revenue numbers.Also, to the Entrepreneurs, CEOs and Business Owners, who are working hard every day to build an organization, who are tasked with exponential growth and who believe that marketing should be doing more than just branding and storytelling. You are not alone, and this book is also for you.’

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The Secret’s Out – Hybrid/Business Book Project

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I wrote a unique hybrid fiction/business book over the past several months with a client and it is now ready for pre-purchase. My client and I believe it is the first of it’s kind and I am honored to have been part of that journey.

This project took a while to come to completion but the project itself was exciting, engaging and a learning curve for myself and my client. Working with a client, who has a vision and makes it into a reality is quite the buzz. 

With regular meetings whether in person or via video conference calls, the project was tailored to my client’s vision of how he wanted the book to relay information, some of which was quite complex, in an easy and engaging manner. The final book has made that dream come true.

Journey to the Summit

A Business Novel by Saher Ghattas
Begin your Inbound adventure.

Journey to the Summit is the only book of its kind for the Canadian business landscape — and it’s available for pre-order right now. All our secrets in an engaging, informative format primed to help businesses embark upon successful growth expeditions. Our new book, Journey to the Summit, is officially open! Be among the first to read this business novel compiling the latest in marketing technologies with years of experience solving the challenges of companies seeking exponential growth. Sign up here:
http://bit.ly/2QAp5RH

I hope you will read the book not only for the fictional story but the incredibly useful marketing information, which will propel your business forward.

 

 

 

Time Management

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My sincere apologies for my lack of posting on this blog (my author site is three times a week: http://www.mandyevebarnett.com) I have been coping with an ‘extended’ deadline with a client. The project started in October 2017 and was supposed to be completed by January 2018. However, the client has been rather too busy to complete their part of the project, hence we may have a completion date of 1st August 2018.

As you can imagine this has complicated my other projects but as it is an exciting and unique project I have been happy to postpone to ensure my client gets the finished project – a book – to his expectations.

Have you encountered an extension of a project like this? I would love to hear about it.

In the meantime I am sharing this helpful article. https://lifehacker.com/the-freelancers-guide-to-time-management-1627697425

Hands Tag Concept

When a Client Requests an Extension to the Deadline

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As we all know we are sometimes put in the position of requesting an extension to a deadline from our clients. However, I was put in the opposite situation with a client recently. The deadline had been set upon agreement of the project and I worked diligently towards that goal.

It soon became apparent that my client’s busy schedule hindered feedback and cancelled appointments were soon commonplace. As any freelancer knows when you have projects pending you schedule each one within the parameters of the deadlines set and give yourself ‘breathing room’ just in case. This particular project has extended nearly two months beyond the original deadline – yep 2 months!

As my other projects are more personal than client based this situation has not hampered or inconvenienced any other parties. It is however an unusual predicament when I am ‘chasing’ my client for updates rather than the other way around. I am walking a fine line between patience and impatience as I had projected a finish line and the ability to immerse myself in a large personal project long before now.

With an impending writing retreat specifically booked to begin my assignment, I am anxious to complete my client’s  project before the end of this month. Fingers crossed it will happen.

Have you ever experienced this kind of situation?

How did you deal with it?

Can you share any tips?

 

8 Questions to Ask a Potential Freelancing Client

client-meeting

When you first meet a potential client, it is preferable to have some idea of the company background prior to the meeting. This can be as simple as reading through their ‘about’ page on their website and familiarizing yourself with the key staff members. Make sure you know about the person you will be meeting.

If the project was by word of mouth ask the person, who referred you something about the company and their interactions with them.

Once you are in the meeting, stay relaxed and mention something you found interesting on their website – this will show you are prepared and have investigated the company prior to the meeting. This is a rather easier introduction than asking a ream of questions at the start of the meeting that takes up time, when it is the project they are more interested in discussing.

Keep your questions project specific – the more information you gather now the better it will be in enabling you to make an informed proposal. Try not to bombard the client with too many questions all at once. However, questions should include:

How do they envision the ‘finished’ project? If you have completed a similar project mention it to show your understanding and expertise. If you have concerns or questions state them now. 

Are there specific project instructions? Ensure you completely understand what they are asking for. If you can see any obstacles then advise them but offer solutions. This may not be possible there and then but note them to investigate later ans report back as soon as you can.

Who is the target audience? Is the project for internal or external use? Is it aimed at a specific demographic? What is the purpose of the project?

What is the tone of the writing they require? Conversational, business formal or brand specific?

How often do they require meetings and/or email communications? Keeping in touch with a client ensures they are not only updated but it also shows you are working towards the deadline. If at any time you need more time tell your client immediately – they will be more understanding than if you ‘hide’.

What is the deadline for the project? Before committing to the deadline research the entire project and ‘add’ time for problems, revisions etc. This ensures you have enough time to complete the project without putting unnecessary demands on yourself. If you finish earlier than expected that will be a bonus.

Will payment be in installments or a lump sum? Asking what method of payments are offered is not a taboo subject. Don’t be shy to state what payment schedule you prefer but be flexible.

Is there potential for future projects? Maybe you feel it is too early to ask this question but it will show your keenness to work with the company.

What specific questions do you feel need to be asked at the first meeting?

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